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When the revolution comes, the first ones up against the wall will be… - Tina Marie's Ramblings
Red hair and black leather, my favorite colour scheme...
skywhisperer
skywhisperer
When the revolution comes, the first ones up against the wall will be the people who use exceptions for flow control.

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driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 10:27 pm (UTC) (Link)
So....Geeky...

I've been meaning to ask you, but you're not online much anymore - how much do you know about homebuilts?
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 10:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yeah, work's been keeping me busy.

I know a little bit about homebuilts - my first airplane was a homebuilt Starduster Too. Why?
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 10:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'm having fantasies about building a WWI biplane.
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 10:38 pm (UTC) (Link)
Quick mind-dump:

A very wise person once told me that you shouldn't build an airplane if you want to fly it. You should only build an airplane if you want to build an airplane.

Also, WWI biplanes were, um, temperamental at their best, and downright nasty at their worst. None of them were designed to land on pavement, and none were designed to land in a crosswind, so you really need a big grass field to keep them happy.

With that said, I've seen plans for WWI planes out there, and I know there's a Foker Triplane that was plans-built locally. A plans-built plane is going to be a 10-year project, if you have no other hobbies. Honestly, I expect the Rheinbeck gang could tell you more about what's available. I'm not sure what you do about an engine, unless you just hide something modern under a fake cowling, but then you may not be able to get the sound right.

Most interesting fantasy, though...
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 10:45 pm (UTC) (Link)
I was looking at a partial built kit for a Fokker biplane (D-VI) that claims to be a 400 hour build. I'm not sure how true that is, but because it's a partial built, it seems plausible.

I am interested in both the building process and the flying. Obviously, I would be working on getting a lot more practice in in the year or two or more it would take to build (I'm planning on going home for awhile after Korea to take dad up on his offer of getting me a license), and if I work specifically with tail draggers, and potentially biplanes, I might have better luck with flying it. To me, it's about building something really neat, and being able to fly it a couple times a year.

Also, yeah, they're all meant to have modern engines, and they've also all (at least in the kits I have seen) been significantly structurally strengthened. The small amount of research I have done tells me that they've been altered enough to make them easier to fly than their original counterparts, but not so much that they're not really accurate anymore. And of course, yes, I would do a grass field. There are a lot of places in NE with grass field options.
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 10:59 pm (UTC) (Link)
When you're here after graduation, hop out to Wolfe Field and see if you can track down the guy with the Triplane. He can probably give you some idea of what's involved.

Even partially built, 400 sounds very low. To give you an idea, we only put new fabric on the Tripacer, and it took us all weekend every weekend for 10 months. That's 16 hours a weekend (which is very low - most were longer, and we went out there some weeknights) * 40 weekends = 640 hours times 2 people = 1280. And that was just the fabric work, and doesn't count all the people who
stopped by for a few hours to help. And if you wanted to do a showplane-quality job, you'd have to at least multiply that by 1.5. Unless it needs nothing but a paint job and seats, 400 is very low.
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 11:27 pm (UTC) (Link)
Good to know. Yeah, I'll get in contact with that guy, and also see if I can talk to the guys at Rhinebeck.

Doesn't it look awesome though?
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 11:36 pm (UTC) (Link)
You're going to let me fly it, right? :)
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 11:39 pm (UTC) (Link)
You bet!

Even if I only fly it in this instance, can you imagine how popular this would make me at WWI events?
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 11:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
Also, I want to talk to you about motorcycles at some point as well.
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 11:38 pm (UTC) (Link)
Cool. Email is probably easiest.

BTW, how do you feel about tapioca balls?
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 11:40 pm (UTC) (Link)
I like them, both as tapioca and as bubble tea.

I'll email you about it, but how much do you think you know about older, simpler bikes?
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: May 1st, 2007 11:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
Not much. I've always had modern bikes. Ask on the motorcycles comm - there are quite a few older bike enthusiasts there.
scarybaldguy From: scarybaldguy Date: May 1st, 2007 11:45 pm (UTC) (Link)
*waves hand*

Are we talking about UJMs, or what?
driftingfocus From: driftingfocus Date: May 1st, 2007 11:52 pm (UTC) (Link)
I really would love to get a bike/sidecar combination á la a WWII BMW R6. An original would be amazing, but would obviously require a lot more upkeep, as well as being considerably more expensive. It's not just because I'm a reenactor and I like old/old style things, I rode in one a couple times while here at Hampshire, and I've wanted one ever since.

I've been looking at some of the Chinese-made replicas of the R4/5/6s, but I'm a bit sketched at the thought of buying something like that that is made in China. Since I'm not necessarily looking for an exact replica, but more something with a similar look, I'm also looking at things like the Ural Patrol.

My parents both owned motorcycles when they were my age, but I know nothing about them myself, about how much upkeep they need, whether a simpler bike like that would be easier to repair/tune up, etc.
scarybaldguy From: scarybaldguy Date: May 1st, 2007 11:56 pm (UTC) (Link)
Sorry, no help here, except to say you're right about avoiding the Chinese copies. I'll second the recommendation to join motorcycles.
grahamwest From: grahamwest Date: May 2nd, 2007 01:53 am (UTC) (Link)
That is generally why I am not a fan of exceptions. At least in Ada they are simple values so people are limited in what they can do with them, and they don't suffer from the double-fault problem.

One of the game teams at Midway shipped a PS2 game with C++ exceptions turned on (and actually _used_ them). That console has a 4KB I-cache and a 4KB D-cache. Somehow they got the game to run at 30Hz (at least by far the majority of the time) but I still considered them crack-addled.
alioth1 From: alioth1 Date: May 2nd, 2007 11:42 am (UTC) (Link)
Can you anonymize it a little and send it to the Daily WTF? Sounds like you've discovered a good WTF :-)

Exceptions are often over-used. Especially by the Java/NET crowd.

Then again, you can use exceptions to describe the CEO of Microsoft :-)

public LegalThreats SteveBallmer(Developers developers) throws Chair
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