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My new cast iron frying pans. I know, you're… - Tina Marie's Ramblings
Red hair and black leather, my favorite colour scheme...
skywhisperer
skywhisperer



My new cast iron frying pans. I know, you're supposed to buy them used at a yard sale, or get them from your grandmother, or something like that. I found the set of 3 for $7 at Harbor Freight Tools.

Anyway, I've had them for months, but I took them out of the box for the first time tonight. That's when I found the warning label.


Yes, this cookware might get hot. And just how am I supposed to cook in them with the label there?

In blatant violation of the label, I removed it, and they're now in the oven, getting hot, and seasoning.

I'm sure something bad will happen to me later.

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Comments
planegirl From: planegirl Date: October 25th, 2005 12:57 am (UTC) (Link)

absurdity of liability

I LOVE cast iron!!! Your set looks beautiful.... What will be the first dish you prepare in one of those fine specimens?
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: October 25th, 2005 01:20 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: absurdity of liability

Cornbread will definately be first. After that, I don't know. I hear they're wonderful for frying eggs, but I don't like fried eggs.

I'm open to suggestions for what should come next...
planegirl From: planegirl Date: October 25th, 2005 01:28 am (UTC) (Link)

cookery

upside down cake! my favorite kind is pear-almond upside down cake, but pineapple works, too.
gosh, now i am getting hungry
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: October 25th, 2005 01:33 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: cookery

Ooh, yeah! And potstickers!
(Deleted comment)
alioth1 From: alioth1 Date: October 28th, 2005 06:55 pm (UTC) (Link)
I thought a dutch oven was where you farted in bed and trapped your partner under the covers? Or am I mistaken? :-)
(Deleted comment)
acelightning From: acelightning Date: October 25th, 2005 08:47 am (UTC) (Link)
i have a big cast-iron dutch oven that can be used on top of the stove or in the oven (or in a fireplace, if i had one). it's great for things like baked beans, paella, even stew. my son tried to take it when he moved out, but i told him he'd have to get one of his own ;-)
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: October 25th, 2005 10:10 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ooh, I didn't even think about baked beans!
acelightning From: acelightning Date: October 25th, 2005 10:47 pm (UTC) (Link)
i use my great-grandmother's recipe for "Boston" baked beans. it's the simplest form of baked beans, without onion or tomato. my great-grandmother didn't like mustard (and neither do i), so she substituted ground ginger for mustard powder in the basic recipe. she also added some black pepper - apparently she liked things just a bit spicy. (well, for suburban Boston in the late 1800s, this was probably "spicy".) Warning: this takes at least two days to make!
Boston Baked Beans (recipe may be doubled)

1 pound bag dry navy beans or pea beans ("Great Northern" beans work also)
water
1/2 teaspoon salt
pinch baking soda
1/2 cup dark molasses
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger, or "to taste"
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, or "to taste"
4-ounce piece salt pork (fatback)

Rinse beans, then place in a pot with 2 quarts water. Bring to boil, let simmer 2 minutes, then remove from heat, cover, and let stand overnight. Drain beans, discarding liquid. Add another 2 quarts fresh water, the salt and baking powder, and bring beans to a boil again. Simmer until beans are tender, about 1 hour. Drain, reserving liquid this time.

Score the fat side of the salt pork in a criss-cross diamond pattern, with lines about 1/2 inch apart. Place the pork, fat side down, in the bottom of a large covered casserole or dutch oven. Mix together the beans, 2 cups of the cooking liquid, the molasses, brown sugar, and spices. Pour this over the salt pork, cover, and bake at 300 F. for 5 to 7 hours or overnight. Add water as necessary to keep the beans from drying out, or remove lid to allow excess liquid to boil off. They taste even better re-heated.
(my great-grandmother would have cooked them in a big old wood stove, putting the bean pot in the back where the coals were banked, for that long slow cooking.)

acelightning From: acelightning Date: October 25th, 2005 08:46 am (UTC) (Link)
i'll bet you tear the tags off of mattresses, too...
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: October 25th, 2005 04:19 pm (UTC) (Link)
I do! I'm just a wild-and-crazy, live-on-the-edge kind of girl!
alioth1 From: alioth1 Date: November 1st, 2005 09:13 pm (UTC) (Link)
Oh, I discovered that I own a cast iron frying pan. Left by the previous owners of my house. Nice heavy thing with a wooden handle.
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: November 1st, 2005 10:00 pm (UTC) (Link)
There are lots of good sites on seasoning cast iron, but in a nutshell: clean it, coat it with some sort of cooking oil, and bake. I had to cook in mine a few times before it really took, but when it does, you'll have an amazingly non-stick surface.
alioth1 From: alioth1 Date: November 2nd, 2005 08:53 am (UTC) (Link)
It is already amazingly non-stick (it looks well-used, so I'm sure the previous owners had done this). How often do you need to perform maintenance on it in this manner? (I'm assuming the non-stickiness doesn't last forever, but can be easily restored).
skywhisperer From: skywhisperer Date: November 2nd, 2005 04:01 pm (UTC) (Link)
You should re-do it whenever it starts to get sticky. No soap when you wash it - just use warm water - or you'll break down the oil and have to start over.
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